Crochet Slipknot
3 Ways to make one.

Making a Crochet Slipknot is the first lesson every beginner should learn. It's the right way to put your yarn on your crochet hook.

When I learned crochet (at age 10) I thought it was a pesky step I didn't have to take. After all, I could just tie a knot on the hook and go. My Mother let me make mistakes, and cut the knot out a few times, before she 'taught' me how (I was resisting). She casually sat down to begin a project (pretending not to teach me), and (on purpose) made mistakes in her chain count, just so she could undo the chain and simply pull the slipknot apart. It only took me, watching this, 3 times before I asked her to show me.

She started by teaching me how to do it on a table top (she called it a pretzel). This also taught me how to make a slipknot for anything else I might want to use it for. Then showed me how to do it on my fingers. It was a few years later (in a crochet club) that I learned how to do it on one finger. To this day I still use 2 fingers (I think that's because it's the way I first learned).

This lesson will teach you three ways to make a crochet slipknot. As you venture out into crochet world you will see many more ways. Learn as much as you can.

Crochet Materials & Tools for Beginners. The Crochet Slipknot.

Yarn: I strongly suggest a person starts learning with 4 ply Crochet Cotton. Just below you can see 3 popular brands, carried in most stores. This is not a recommendation, just what you are likely to see the most of. There are many wonderful, beautiful brands. Over time you'll find your favorites.

Crochet Hook: I suggest starting with an I-9 / 5.5mm crochet hook. This size makes a good stitch, that's easy to see and count. Please do not start with a plastic or wooden one. The two that I have pictured below are standard ones. Boye is an inexpensive one that you'll practically find everywhere. It's the hook I started with. Clover is the hook I use now. The cushioned handle makes it easier for me to crochet with (keep in mind I've been crocheting since 1966, lol).

Other Materials & Supplies: Have a scissors handy, I use a small one. While you're shopping you could also pick up some yarn needles. Please don't buy plastic, there are some nice sets that are made of metal. You won't need needles for the first few lessons, but they are good to have on hand.

A Note About Stitch Markers: In almost all of my photos you'll see I use bobby pins. You can buy a card full of them for half of what a few (designed for crocheting) cost. And I find they work better. Another idea is to save some of the plastic tabs off of bread wrappers. I've also heard that safety pins work well, I've never tried them. When all else fails you can also use paper clips. I use a paper clip when I'm going to set my work down for awhile, and when I'm traveling with my crochet.

Crochet Slipknot: Learn on a Table Top

You can download this full lesson, to a PDF file, at the end of the page.

The reason it's good to learn how to do this on a flat surface is because it teaches you how a slipknot works. There are other uses for this knot, other than crochet, and if you learn how it's made you'll use it in other parts of your life.

Start by forming a loop on a flat surface. Your yarn end should be on the left side.

Bring the side that's still attached to the skein (or the right side) up and cross over the yarn on the left.

Then lift up your original loop and bring the end down and under it. Now you can see why my Mother called it a pretzel.

To put the knot on your hook bring hook - from right to left - over the first thread, under the next, and over the last 2 threads.

Gather the 2 threads on the bottom.

Pull them down. This tightens the knot.

Drop the loose end, and pull on the thread that's still attached to your skein. This moves the knot up to your crochet hook.

To untie the knot (remove your hook) simply pull on the 2 ends and the crochet slipknot will undo.

Crochet Slipknot: On 2 Fingers

You can download this full lesson, to a PDF file, at the end of the page.

If you've ever watched someone start a crochet project you've seen them tangle the yarn on their fingers and somehow come out with a clean knot on their hook. This method uses 2 fingers and still keeps the 'pretzel' theme.

Hold your loose end in front of 2 fingers, go over your fingers from bottom up, drop it behind, and bring it back up. The CROSSING you see by my thumb is very important.

Hold the crossing section with your thumb, and carefully remove your fingers out of the loop.

Let the end, attached to the skein, drop behind the loop. You are now holding the 'pretzel' in the air.

Thread you hook in, from the right, in the same "over-under-over" way. You are picking up the thread that was dropped behind.

Just as in the table method above, hold on to the 2 threads on the bottom and gently pull them. This tightens the knot.

Drop the loose end and pull on the end still attached to your skein. This moves the knot up to your crochet hook.

As before, to untie the knot (remove your hook) simply pull on the 2 ends and the crochet slipknot will undo.

Crochet Slipknot: On 1 Finger

You can download this full lesson, to a PDF file, at the end of the page.

Have you watched crochet videos? Have you seen them whip a couple of threads over each other and POOF they have a slipknot? Here's what they are doing (very slowed down) so you can too.

Hold your thread in front of your finger, loose end down, and (not too tight) wrap it around your finger 2 times (going toward the outside of your finger). Secure both threads with your thumb.

Pick up the back thread (closest to your hand) and bring it over the front thread.

Pick up the back thread again (closest to your hand) and bring that one over the front, over your finger, and down under.

Thread your hook into the loop left on your finger. Hold both ends and pull down (to tighten the knot). 

Drop the loose end, pull on the end attached to your skein, to move the knot up to your hook.

You undo the crochet slipknot the same. Pull on both ends (with the hook out) and your knot releases.


All text and photos, of this Crochet Slipknot Lesson, are original. Notice of Copyright © by Sandy Marie & Mom's Crochet, June 2016. All rights reserved.
Original Copyright: July 2011

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